A Young Worker’s Look at Company Culture

Less discrimination among young workers

Written by Amanda G. Kassis

The 2019 EEOC numbers regarding workplace discrimination charges were recently  released and show a 5% decrease from 2018. This is a promising improvement but don’t be so quick to let your guard down. We have a long way to go. The EEOC still reports 72,675 reported cases of discrimination (including harassment) in the last year. And that doesn’t include claims made to state agencies or through private legal counsel. So, there is still a lot of work to be done.  Retaliation, sexual harassment, race, and disability are still the leading reasons for discrimination charges followed by age and national origin. So how do we improve? How do we get these number down? We work on our company culture. Make changes that lead to inclusive, respectful, unprejudiced, work environments. Implement a fair investigation process to increase the chances of every party feeling that a fair resolution can be met before resorting to litigation. And, we teach our employees the meaning and practice of civility.

Unemployment is down to 3.5% and it is changing the way people look for jobs. Job seekers are becoming more critical of the companies they want to work for, and expectations are high. With so many options available the incoming workforce is focusing more on company culture, values, and priorities. Job seekers are above all looking for a company who puts their people first.

Hello Heart reports than half of U.S. employers have implemented wellness programs to meet a growing demand that has emerged from employees who are prioritizing their mental and physical health. To sustain a healthy culture, employers need to be actively listening to employees about what it’s like to work for their company, and what they’re experiencing. It is also important to be aware of how communication is changing. Many companies are implementing online portals where disputes can be worked out or complaints can be lodged. The younger generation of employees may be more inclined to deal with conflict though these resources, rather than in person.

It’s all about the people. Foster relationships with your employees as you would with any other important relationship in your life. Create a trusting rapport with your employees. You want them to feel like they can go to their HR team in times of turmoil and be treated fairly and with compassion. They want to feel appreciated and listened to. Employees want to know that even their smallest concerns are being addressed and taken seriously. As Aretha Franklin once so eloquently put it, it’s all about R-E-S-P-E-C-T. Create a respectful environment and, most importantly, model the behaviors you want to see. Most often good patterns of behavior start at the top. Employees will look to management to see how they are expected to act and handle conflict. And the difficult but most important part, hold yourself and others accountable for their actions and communications. Don’t be afraid to admit where your company is lacking, make an effort to change it, and be transparent about the process with your employees.

A company’s culture is the sum of many parts and is ever changing and growing. Employees spend a large amount of their lives at work, so do your best to create a place they can enjoy and feel safe. If we can create a culture within our companies that doesn’t just respect but celebrates people for their unique and diverse backgrounds and experiences, not only will business thrive but it is without doubt that we can continue to drive discrimination out of the workplace.

If you want to review the amount and types of cases prevalent in your state you can find it here.

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